Controversial FREE Training Program

12 Weeks to More Muscle Mass

A fully updated guide to building lean muscle mass without lifting weights. Learn about a new muscle building technique each week for 12 weeks. Includes a sample routine for each week along with training logs. 

Benefits of Split Training with Pushups, Pullups, and Bodyweight Squats


As you progress with your bodyweight training, you will need to eventually split up your training. A body part split is where you train only two or three muscle groups per workout, as opposed to training the entire body in one workout. Most workouts featured on this website are full body.

There are numerous ways to split up your body effectively using bodyweight training. Here are the top three methods you can use:

Sample Method #1:

  • Day One - Upper Body
    • Train with pushups and pullups variations
  • Day Two - Lower Body
    • Train with lower body exercises. Core training is optional.

Sample Method #2:

  • Day One - Upper Body Push
    • Train with pushup variations.
  • Day Two - Lower Body
    • Train with lower body exercises. Core training is optional.
  • Day Three - Upper Body Pull
    • Train with pullup variations.

    Sample Method #3:

    • Day One - Upper Body Push
      • Train with pushups variations.
    • Day Two - Lower Body
      • Train with lower body variations.
    • Day Three - Upper Body Pull
      • Train with pushup variations.
    • Day Four - Core
      • Perform exercises targeting abdominals and lower back.

        Best Uses of Split Workouts: Mass and Strength Gain


        Two of the best uses for split training programs is mass and strength gain.

        Train more Often

        One of the key aspects to mass and strength gain is to train more often. However, you still want to train at a high intensity level. A high frequency full body program can often be extremely taxing on your body. For example, if it takes you 3 days to recover from a full body workout, and you're planning to train 6 days a week for maximum muscle mass, well...you're going to over train your body and you results will stop, or actually regress.

        Instead, split up body so that you're training each muscle group as often as possible without complete burn out. The cool thing about split training is that when you're performing pullups, you're also indirectly working your abs and chest.

        So, you're other muscle groups are still getting a muscle building effect, without being directly trained.

        Greater Attention to Detail

        When you train full body, you often fail to recognize your weaknesses. Your strengths take over when the goal is to complete the workout within a faster period of time. Well, for mass and strength gain, a faster muscle is second to a stronger muscle.

        If you're muscles aren't strong, you'll never get bigger. Remember the stress principle? You need to overload the muscle with greater stress by constantly adding new, more difficult variations of the same exercise. If you never get stronger, then you'll never be able to switch to more difficult variations.

        So, when you focus on just one or two muscle groups per workout, you get a chance to identify and target your weaknesses.

        Creating Effective Split Workouts


        Creating effective split workouts follows the same set of rules as creating effective full body workouts. Lets take, for example, one of my favorite forms of program design: ascending reps. Ascending reps are where the repetitions increase after each set.

        To create an upper body ascending rep workout, you just need to alternate between a pushup and pullup variation. Here is a sample workout:

        For time of:

        • Plyometric Pushups, 5 reps
        • Pullups, 2 reps
        • Plyometric Pushups, 10 reps
        • Pullups, 4 reps
        • Plyometric Pushups, 15 reps
        • Pullups, 6 reps
        • Plyometric Pushups, 20 reps
        • Pullups, 8 reps

        In short, simply use the same intensity techniques that I've been teaching you through this website with split training programs.

        Training Frequency made Easy


        As mentioned earlier, split training programs allow you to train a muscle group more frequently and with greater focus. However, how do you actually go about scheduling your workouts based on the days you have to workout, and the training split that you choose?

        Well, lets assume you are using a push/pull/legs split and have 4 days a week to train. What I would do in this situation is to combine split and full body workouts for a more complete fitness plan. Here's a sample schedule:

        • Monday: Upper Body Push Strength & Mass Workout
        • Tuesday: Lower Body Strength & Mass Workout
        • Wednesday: Rest
        • Thursday: Upper Body Pull Strength & Mass workout
        • Friday: Rest
        • Saturday: Full Body Fat Loss Workout
        • Sunday: Rest

        As you can see, with this method you're effectively targeting your weaknesses, and performing one full body fat loss workout to prevent fat gain. One of the biggest mistakes people make with their mass and strength programs is they end up over eating, stopping all cardio or cardio-like activities, and end up gaining fat.

        By adding just one or two days of full body circuit training that is separate of your regular strength and mass workouts would help you prevent both fat gain and burn out.

        Training 7 Days a  Week?


        Technically, you can train 7 days a week with a split program. But I would advise against training at such a high frequency. There are two main reasons why:

        • When you train one muscle group, you're almost always training other muscle groups indirectly. So, technically your muscles are getting some sort of simulation every single day. World class athletes can get away with high frequency training because they eat a lot, and because their jobs depend on it. So, if you wish to train every single day, then make sure your eating and rest is up to par.
        • You'll risk mental burnout. Almost always, my mind burns out before my body. There are some day where I just don't feel like working out. That's fine, as long as that feeling isn't every day. When you train 3-4 days a week, you can give not just your body a rest, but your mind as well.

        I've trained up to 10 days in a row in the past. The only time I find such a high level of frequency beneficial is if you're going away on a short vacation and know for a fact that you won't have any time to workout. So, you can easily train 15 days in a row, and then take 7-8 days off from training.

        But, I wouldn't make this a habit. It's just a good strategy to use from time to time.

        Controversial FREE Training Program

        12 Weeks to More Muscle Mass

        A fully updated guide to building lean muscle mass without lifting weights. Learn about a new muscle building technique each week for 12 weeks. Includes a sample routine for each week along with training logs.